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My Best Entry - Weeks 7-12

Oct. 25th, 2008 | 08:10 pm
mood: relievedrelieved

 

I had some trouble choosing my favourite entry from the second half of this semester, but Week 10 was definately one of my more thought-provoking moments :)

http://mel-jamhour.livejournal.com/22909.html

Literature Entry Week 10
 

"Till the villian left the path of ease
to walk in perilous path, and drive
the just man into barren climes"

This quote from The Argument becomes intergral in establishing who is the villian and who is the justman in the mindset of Blake.

Blake's context is one of revolutions, specifically the French and American, and revoltuions are characterised by the challenge of status and heriarchy. Blake's role in the revolution can be categorised by that of the minority, the 'good', with the hierarchy being the opposing force.

The question begins to be pondered...if the minority is evil in the eyes of the hierarchy, and the hierarchy evil in the eyes of the minority, then which is the villian and which is the just?

If we consider a modern context the same question can be posed. Terrorists believe that they are doing god's will and their actions are deemed good. Westerners however see their actions as those of terrorism and therefore see them as an evil.

BUT how are the westerners any different? Terrorists are deemed terrorists because they take lives of the innocent through their actions. However westerners do the same when they order air strikes that kill innocent civilians in retaliation.

SO....who is good and who is evil????

The answer lies simply in the fact that theyre cannot be good and evil as seperate entities because it is in the nature of every human being to be capable of both.

I see myself as a good person but my view of what is good can differ completely from that of another person.

SO, who sets the guidelines as to what is good and what is evil?

THIS, I believe, is the ultimate view of Blake in The Argument. The villian and the just man can interrelate between the hierarcy and the minority because they are both capable of both good and evil...

THEREFORE, there is no villian and there is no just man....

BECAUSE....we are ALL capable of being both so we cannot differentiate between the two.


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Literature Entry Week 12 - My Reflection

Oct. 25th, 2008 | 08:02 pm
mood: accomplishedaccomplished

Well what an experience this semester has been! At first I wasn't too thrilled at the concept of studying Blake but I am the first to admit that my initial dislike at the change in unit was quickly overturned by the limitless possibility and imagination provided by this amazing man.

The most important and impacting thing that I am taking away from this unit is a new perspective. Blake has made so clear the importance of the imagination and the one concept that will always stand out to me about his work is his idea of seeing through the eye rather than with the eye. Blake has demonstrated that seeing through the eye not with the eye truly allows us to live and experience life and prevents us from being limited by our senses.  It is well known that Blake believed the imagination to be the ultimate force and power an individual could possess, and when taking this into account this principle makes a lot of sense.

The topic of my week six entry was Principle VI from There is no Natural Religion:

"The desires and perceptions of man untaught by anything but organs of sense, must be limited to objects of sense"

If it cannot be sensed by any of our five senses then how can it be real? I think this view is a consequence of being a part of a contemporary and young generation who are beginning to loose the ability to think outside the box and see outside the square
 there are objects beyond our five senses of touch, smell, sight, taste and sound. Being able to explore beyond these senses by the application of imagination and emotion is the true gift Blake is talking about in this quote. It is the challenge of all of us to explore our poetic genius and see beyond our senses and gain understanding into something beyond convention. Its a challenge tosee through the eye rather than with the eye and break the limits imposed by knowledge without imagination. Once this is achieved then individuals can see the "infinite"  and limitless possibility and knowledge available, rather than just seeing himself in their simple and limited existence.”

After a semester of study I truly believe this to be the core of Blake’s mindset. Without the ability to see through the eye and witness life for more than it seems an individual will never know true judgement or true existence. Blake rejected established religion, rejected the idea that one should be governed by another human who deemed themselves superior. Blake was not afraid to challenge the norm and show people what his poetic genius was and it is through his expression that we understand and desire to show our own.

 

This is the most impacting thing that I have taken from this unit. I have learnt so much more but this idea of seeing through the eye rather than with, and the notion of exploring beyond the five senses and into the poetic genius that will be Blake’s imprint on me. It was really insightful learning about this man and I am truly glad that this topic was brought to us. Thanks MG for making it so enjoyable through your passion. You will be missed!


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Literature Entry Week 11

Oct. 17th, 2008 | 06:35 am
mood: contemplativecontemplative

My entry this week is inspired by the key themes of The Argument from Marriage of Heaven and Hell.

I make my own decisions
Based on what i consider
Wrong and Right

I act how I see fit
Based on my morals
And my consequential foresight

But how am I to say
That what I think and
how I act is 'good' and pure

When they may differ
from that of others
In what they consider good and sure.

So the question beckons...
who sets the standards of
villianous and just

When we all see such
things differently
and in such views we sincerely trust

The challenge is set for all
to avoid judgement
and contempt

Because how are we to know
what is right in a world
so diverse, so large and so different?

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Literature Entry Week 10

Oct. 8th, 2008 | 08:28 pm
mood: creativecreative

"Till the villian left the path of ease
to walk in perilous path, and drive
the just man into barren climes"

This quote from The Argument becomes intergral in establishing who is the villian and who is the justman in the mindset of Blake.

Blake's context is one of revolutions, specifically the French and American, and revoltuions are characterised by the challenge of status and heriarchy. Blake's role in the revolution can be categorised by that of the minority, the 'good', with the hierarchy being the opposing force.

The question begins to be pondered...if the minority is evil in the eyes of the hierarchy, and the hierarchy evil in the eyes of the minority, then which is the villian and which is the just?

If we consider a modern context the same question can be posed. Terrorists believe that they are doing god's will and their actions are deemed good. Westerners however see their actions as those of terrorism and therefore see them as an evil.

BUT how are the westerners any different? Terrorists are deemed terrorists because they take lives of the innocent through their actions. However westerners do the same when they order air strikes that kill innocent civilians in retaliation.

SO....who is good and who is evil????

The answer lies simply in the fact that theyre cannot be good and evil as seperate entities because it is in the nature of every human being to be capable of both.

I see myself as a good person but my view of what is good can differ completely from that of another person.

SO, who sets the guidelines as to what is good and what is evil?

THIS, I believe, is the ultimate view of Blake in The Argument. The villian and the just man can interrelate between the hierarcy and the minority because they are both capable of both good and evil...

THEREFORE, there is no villian and there is no just man....

BECAUSE....we are ALL capable of being both so we cannot differentiate between the two.

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Literature Entry Week 9

Sep. 27th, 2008 | 10:16 am
mood: contemplativecontemplative

 The Three Characters.

For our discussion on Blackboard we explored the three characters of Othoon, Theotormon and Bromium. I think the most significant representation of the three characters is presented in the front image of the poem. Below is my summary of each character according first and foremostly to what the image has shown, and then adapting that to the knowledge gained through the poem.

Bromium
Bromium is going to be the commander. He is chained to Othoon and is is very physically imposing. He is looking towards the west, a picture of strength and power. Bromium is in charge of the slaves and has raped Othoon, which supports the image of him being the controller and picture of strength. Bromium can also be said to represent the opinions and expectations of society that have attempted to hold Othoon down to prevent her from exploring her own spirituality and sexuality.

Othoon
Othoon is the obvious victim to the wrath of Bromium. She is chained to Bromium and is in obvious discomfort. Othoon has been raped and is said to represent the oppression of women in Blake's era. She is chained to Bromium as she has no or limited control over her existence because of the attitude of men and society. Theotormon is in agony because Othoon has been taken, but Othoon becomes the picture of strength in her belief that just because she was raped and lost her virginity does not mean that she can not love and be with Theotormon.


Theotormon
He symbolises men in Blake's times. He is so caught up in his own self interest that he has made himself the victim of Bromium's rape and not Othoon. Theotormon is obviously demonstrated as the weaker of the three characters in this text. He is skulking in the corner of the page in obvious agony with his hands sheilding his head. Theotormon is in agony. Othoon had been betrothed to Theotormon but now she has been raped and its 'tainted goods' he is unsure as to whether or not he still loves her. This is stereotypical of the society of Blake's time, who believed that virginity was the ultimate sign of purity.

** Image sourced from Google Images.

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Literature Entry Week 8

Sep. 17th, 2008 | 12:10 pm


Othoon

She represents many things in this text. Her image on the front cover says many things but her role and character in the Visions of the Daughters of Albion is paramount in its feministic approach. Othoon can be described as the human female soul. She embodies an essential freedom and hope for the future. Hope was an issue raised in the tutorial this week and the question that resulted was is she a figure of hope or is she a parody of the society of her times. It is without argument that Othoon represents the native American Indians and their struggles in a new American culture. The fact that she is controlled by and chained to Bromium in being part of the slave trade in itself is ironic. It represents irony in the American Declaration that all men are equal...that is if you are white and of 'American Blood'...its funny how things have changed....note the sarcasm.It is also without argument that she represents the opposition to the idealistic and virtuous view held by men toward women of her time. Othoon is betrothed to Theotormon who no longer wants her because her virginity has been taken in her rape by Bromium. This is almost comedic but sadly it represents the society in which the context lies.

 

It seems that Blake presents Othoon in his attempt to sever the link between purity and virginity that is stressed so highly by both established religion and society as a result. Othoon does not see why Theotormon is in such agony, she sees her sexuality as liberation and something to embrace, not fear. Othoon truly represents a change in social expectation and judgement. She is created by Blake as the character who is emerging into a contemporary society where the struggles and expectations of the past should be left in the past and not brought into the future. If we look back at the notion of the poetic genius and having the ability to see and experience beyond the limitations of the five senses, we can definately say that Othoon has the ability to do so.

"With what sense does the chicken shun the ravenous hawk?" (Plate 6)
 

She questions things that those single and basic minded people do not. She wants more knowledge of how things work and how they came to be.So Blake has created a truly magnificent character who epitomises HOPE...that society and expectations will change due to their ability to see outside of the square and outside the walls of judgement and 'morality'.

 I think she is a fantastic creation by Blake and I found her approach to life, her feminism and lack of fear actually inspiring. Its amazing how Blake put his finger right on the mark in regards to the true role and picture of true feminism before the likes of the true feminism writers and activistis Virginia Woolf (Professions for Women, 1942) and Mina Loy.

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Literature Entry Week 7: Comment on Mariam's Week 7 Post

Sep. 15th, 2008 | 09:03 pm
mood: restlessrestless

http://mazza-7.livejournal.com/35681.html

I missed out on the tutorial this week but in catching up on the work done on The Little Black Boy I found that Mariam's entry reflected my initial responses to the poem.

I love this poem from Blake. I think that it is a true statement on race and how something like having to explain to a child why their skin is different to other people is something so touching and real that it is truly impacting on the responder. The gift of light is a constant symbol in this poem, and I like how Mariam has explored it:

"What makes him different from the white people is the special gift he has received from God..this “light” which helps his grow spiritually – that’s what makes him different. I find this gift of light a recurring motif throughout the poem symbolising the love and experience this boy has to show the world; just like Jesus was a lamb put on this earth to show us a better way to live spiritually, so this boy’s purpose becomes clear as he tries to remove the “cloud” which is hovering over society, blurring their vision"

I really like how you have explored the motif of the light. I think this aspect is so important to the core meaning of this poem and I think you have done really well in showing how important it really is.

“Bearing the beams of love” according to Blake, is the way to become more spiritually connected with ourselves and our “poetic genius”, because it is through suffering and hardship that our experiences are deepened and opened to better growth."

This is another point that stood out to me in your entry this week. We have explored the poetic genius extensively in class and it is something that we continue to deepen our understanding and definition of. This is the first time that love has been associated with the poetic genius for me and I think you have created a new aspect to the complicated notion that only increases what we have already established about its character.

I think you're entry this week was really thought provoking and this is why I wanted to comment on it....great work hun your journal is really good :D


 

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Best Literature Entry - Week 6

Sep. 6th, 2008 | 08:50 am
mood: contentcontent

I have chosen my week six entry on "There is no Natural Religion" as my best and favourite post. This work by Blake has been my favourite by far.

Literature Entry - Week Six

Sep. 6th, 2008 | 08:45 am
mood: exhausted exhausted

"The desires and perceptions of man untaught by anything but organs of sense, must be limited to objects of sense"

For this week I've chosen to explore Principle VI from Blake's There is no Natural Religion.
The first opinion and intepretation that came into my thoughts was that the only desires that can be true and real can be sense. If it cannot be sensed by any of our five senses then how can it be real? I think this view is a consequence of being a part of a contemporary and young generation who are beginning to loose the ability to think outside the box and see outside the square.
After much discussion in the tutorial, we were able to break down this principle. What I now understand by it is that there are objects beyond our five senses of touch, smell, sight, taste and sound. Being able to explore beyond these senses by the application of imagination and emotion is the true gift Blake is talking about in this quote. It is well known that Blake believed the imagination to be the ultimate force and power an individual could possess, and when taking this into account this principle makes a lot of sense.
It is the challenge of all of us to explore our poetic genius and see beyond our senses and gain understanding into something beyond convention. Its a challenge tosee through the eye rather than with the eye and break the limits imposed by knowledge without imagination. Once this is achieved then individuals can see the "infinite"  and limitless possibility and knowledge available, rather than just seeing himself in their simple and limited existence.

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Literature Entry - Week Six

Sep. 6th, 2008 | 08:45 am
mood: exhaustedexhausted

"The desires and perceptions of man untaught by anything but organs of sense, must be limited to objects of sense"

For this week I've chosen to explore Principle VI from Blake's There is no Natural Religion.
The first opinion and intepretation that came into my thoughts was that the only desires that can be true and real can be sense. If it cannot be sensed by any of our five senses then how can it be real? I think this view is a consequence of being a part of a contemporary and young generation who are beginning to loose the ability to think outside the box and see outside the square.
After much discussion in the tutorial, we were able to break down this principle. What I now understand by it is that there are objects beyond our five senses of touch, smell, sight, taste and sound. Being able to explore beyond these senses by the application of imagination and emotion is the true gift Blake is talking about in this quote. It is well known that Blake believed the imagination to be the ultimate force and power an individual could possess, and when taking this into account this principle makes a lot of sense.
It is the challenge of all of us to explore our poetic genius and see beyond our senses and gain understanding into something beyond convention. Its a challenge tosee through the eye rather than with the eye and break the limits imposed by knowledge without imagination. Once this is achieved then individuals can see the "infinite"  and limitless possibility and knowledge available, rather than just seeing himself in their simple and limited existence.

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Literature Entry - Week 5

Aug. 29th, 2008 | 03:39 pm
mood: contentcontent

Poetic Genius


What is the Poetic Genius? Do we all have one? Are we all influenced by it?

My interpretation of the poetic genius is our ability to express our inner being. It is what allows us to create, express and shape the artistic/spiritual version of our true being and our true self. As MG mentioned in the tutorial, it could even be said that the human creation itself is the external shape of poetic genius.

In planning for next week's discussion, I considered what Blake's intention for discovering the notion of poetic genius. Blake believed that human imagination was of paramount importance. In his Illuminated Works Blake first explores the idea of the poetic genius. The poetic genius is seen as the ability of the human being to express their imaginatory and visionary capacity. As humans we have the ability and desire to create, shape, colour and texture (Principle 1st ) but the way in which we do so is fundamentally within our own intiative and desire. Ultimately, the poetic genius allows us to explore the unknown (Principle 4) and allows us to cross over what is known to things yet to be discovered.
 

My question is, how is my poetic genius shown and what does my poetic genius represent?

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